Blog Hop: “The Next Big Thing”

I’m really thankful to my fellow Indie Author Jeff Whelan author of the remarkable Space Orville for tagging me for this Blog Hop!
Basically, it’s an opportunity to talk about our ‘Next Big Thing’, linking to the person who tagged you the week before, and tagging 5 other authors for next week.

It comes right on schedule, since my Next Big thing is almost ready to see the world. My Sore Hush-a-Bye, my novel, will be released next month.

So, let me tell you all about it!

What is the working title of your book?

My Sore Hush-a-Bye is the title of my novel, which will be released in November, 2012.

Front and Back cover

 Where did the idea come from for the book?

For the most part, from Mama Cass, and the song “All the Pretty Little Horses”, as I explained on this previous post

What genre does your book fall under?

I believe it’s a coming-of-age mystery, but some people have classified it as a psychological thriller.

Which actors would you choose to play your characters in a movie rendition?

Oh my, can I dream of it? Okay!

I thought Alec Baldwin would be a perfect Uncle Bob, but after watching the season premiere of “30 Rock”, I’m not so sure anymore. The guy looks ten years younger this season! How does he do that? 😀

For Camille, I can’t think of anyone… Maybe a new, unknown actress. (who would rise to fame after this blockbuster… Okay, I’ll wake up now! :))

What is the one-sentence synopsis of your book?

Growing up can change everything…

Will your book be self-published or represented by an agency?

Self-published. I love to do it all! (Yeah, I am a control freak…)

How long did it take you to write the first draft of your manuscript?

I thought it would take me ages, but somehow I finished it in less than three months! (Camille really wanted me to tell her story and kept whispering in my ear incessantly.)

What other books would you compare this story to within your genre?

That’s a tricky question—difficult to answer without sounding presumptuous—but I believe that “What They Do In The Dark”, by Amanda Coe, “A Thousand Cuts” (American edition) “Rupture” (Original British edition) by Simon Lelic, “Black Heart Blue”, by Louisa Reid, “Still Missing”, by Chevy Stevens and “Cemetery Girl”, by David Bell, are books with similar themes.

Who or What inspired you to write this book?

Again, I think this post explains it all. In short—Mama Cass was a huge inspiration.

What else about your book might pique the reader’s interest?

What?  Do you mean my charming smile is not enough? 🙂

Seriously now, I like to write about dark and twisted themes, in the hope that one day they will only exist in fiction. Unfortunately, there are loads of kids suffering the same ordeal that Camille describes in my book. Since most of them are never going to have the chance to tell their stories, I think it’s important to read this one (and many others from other authors), even if it’s fictional, so people will perhaps be more alert to recognize the signs. There may be a child right next to you in need of help, and you may not see it if you don’t know what to look for. I hope that my fictional story might help giving voice to helpless true children everywhere.

Now it’s my turn to tag 5 other fellow Authors, who will post their answers next Wednesday on their blogs.
Please meet my dear friends and amazing authors:

Ruth Nestvold

T.M. Souders

Massimo Marino

Ally Malinenko

Bev Jones

Bookmark them, so you won’t miss their great posts next week!
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The best creative writing course – reading!

Every writer is also a reader. We love books, we need to read to be happy.

I’m one of those compulsive readers that can’t stand not having a book to read at the moment. I’m also a proud kindle owner, and believe ebooks are the most amazing thing ever invented.

Of course when you’re a writer, you read in a different, more critical way. You read to be inspired by other authors, and, sometimes, to find motivation to keep writing. It happened to me more than once; I’m reading just for pleasure (or think I am) and start taking notes as if in a class, because the sentences are so brilliant, the characters so well constructed, the story so beautifully told that I think: “Boy, that’s what I want:  to write something that good!”

Reading is the best creative writing course for me. I’ve learned so much from reading great authors! Sometimes you learn what not to do, but that’s not the point! 🙂

Of course, since I love dark, twisted and damaged characters, I read books where they live. I try to always write a review, and, if there’s a way, write to the author just to let them now how much I enjoyed their work. I think this is the least I can do to say “thank you” for their time and effort. Everybody should do that.

I had received amazing responses. Authors are kind people who love to hear from readers. Try it!

These are some of the best books I’ve had the pleasure of reading so far. Some are Indies, some are not. I don’t care how a book is published, I just want the story to be great.

In these books, the weather and locations are characters, as important to the plots as the people on the pages.  They describe a tense, dark, almost suffocating world, where the characters are consumed by their ordeals.

Ruth Rendell is a master. Her stand-alones are must-read

This was the first book in this genre that I read, when I was only thirteen – it hooked me for life!

Absolutely amazing. This story has some of the best metaphors I’ve ever had the pleasure of reading. The plot is superb too

Certainly one of the best books I’ve ever read. Almost impossible to describe without spoiling your reading.

Oh my, what a debut! This author is someone to follow. What a gift with words; so perfectly constructed characters. Plus, the author is a really nice person.

This is the American edition of Rupture (UK). Great book about bullying.

Simon Lelic has a compelling way of telling stories.

An excellent debut. I’ll be looking forward for the next book from this author

Sorrel Pitts develops a magnificent tense atmosphere to tell this story.

This is a haunting tale that will stay in your mind for days after finishing the story.

This book is very slow-paced, but it’s a great journey

This is a great coming-of-age story. It’s very dark and extremely sad in some points, with poetical touches all over the text.

I deeply care about not-that-enjoyable characters. You know, the problematic ones, those that proclaimed themselves as bad people, like Libby Day does. And she is so twisted, you end up loving her.

After reading this book you are sure going to watch your back more often and be more careful, especially if you’re a woman.

If the only thing you have are other people’s words as your memories, how can you be sure what’s true?

The author has a beautiful style. His prose is natural, with an excellent pace that keeps you wanting to read more and more.